Maison Bruno Paillard launches 2006 Blanc de Blancs

17 October, 2016

Maison Bruno Paillard has launched its 2006 Blanc de Blancs Champagne, described by its founder as ‘voluptous’, onto the UK market.

The 2006 is the seventh Blanc de Blancs vintage create by the Maison, and it is a blend of Chardonnay grapes from the Cote des Blancs.

As with previous cuvees from the Maison, the 2006 Blanc de Blancs has a very low dosage and is ‘Extra Brut. It has spent more than nine years on the lees in the Maison’s cellars and a further 12 months ‘recovery’ post disgorgement, which took place in 2015.

Founder Bruno Paillard, said: “2006 was a year with very clear seasons. Winter saw freezing temperatures reaching as low as -17 degrees in the Montagne de Reims. Springtime remained cool, but with frosty episodes. The really good weather arrived late, on 10th June, and flowering began from the 15th, during the best possible conditions. July, as with the 2003, was scorching! But August saw temperatures drop and rain arrive, sparking some concern. Fortunately, by September, the good weather returned and the harvest took place in the second half of the month, in sunshine. And it was abundant. This is a generous and delicious vintage, but also demanding: it was important to sort carefully and only keep the best bunches”.

Since his very first vintage in 1981, Bruno Paillard has commissioned an artist to design the label according to a theme that reflects the characteristics of the year.  For 2006, the Swedish painter, Jockum Nordström, illustrated the label according to the theme "Volupté," in keeping with the generosity and roundness of mature citrus fruits in this wine.

Champagne Bruno Paillard Blanc de Blancs 2006 will be available via Bibendum PLB and Walker & Wodehouse from 2017, with a recommended retail price of £80.

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