Brand extension for hugely successful no-alcohol Beck's Blue

29 January, 2016

AB InBev is following through on its commitment to ensuring 20% of its global beer are low-to-no alcohol by 2020 with the release of Beck’s Blue Lemon in the UK.

Beck’s Blue Lemon is a brand extenstion of Beck’s Blue alcohol-free beer, which is the market-leading product in the low-to-no-alcohol sector with around 65% market share.

The segment is currently growing at 11.1% year on year, according to date from IRI for the year to end January 2, 2016.

Beck’s Blue is driving the sector’s growth, with annual sales up 15.4% over the same period.

Sales of Beck’s Blue account for some 86.5% of category growth.

Beck’s Blue Lemon features the familiar flavour profile of its parent brand, but with an added twist of lemon.

It is launching in 6x275ml format in Sainsbury’s stores nationwide and will roll out across other retailers in the coming months.

Aina Fuller, senior brand manager at AB InBev, said: “Launching Beck’s Blue Lemon is about encouraging consumers to make smart drinking choices by providing further choice. 

“The Beck’s brand is all about its German heritage and being progressive – so we are motivating our consumers to twist it up, drinking Beck’s Blue Lemon as an alternative when they are looking to stay sharp and moderate their drinking.

“Lots of consumer’s don’t realise that Beck’s Blue and Beck’s Blue Lemon are beers in every sense of the word – just alcohol free.

“They still use the same four key ingredients – barley, hops, yeast and water, and go through the traditional brewing process.

“The only difference is  that they undergo a special and gentle de-alcolisation process to remove the alcohol from the beer but maintain the great taste and flavour.”

Low- and no-alcohol beer is particularly popular among millennials, with 21% of them likely to consider it as a drink of choice.
 




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