Boisset seeks to revive Macon wines

17 June, 2015

Burgundy producer Boisset is aiming to prove that the region can innovate by sourcing grapes from new areas and taking Macon in a fresh direction.

It sent its winemaker up the Maconnais to discover new areas and return with access to grapes to develop a range of single vineyard wines designed to cause the trade to reappraise Macon.

Jon Tracey, UK business manager at Boisset, told OLN: “We think Macon is an important pillar of the UK trade. People recognise it as a de facto entry-level white Burgundy. We can do Macon Villages but also go into other villages, like Igé and Azé, that are further up the slopes.

“We sent the winemaker up the Maconais to discover and come back with access to fruit to develop the Maconais project under the Ropiteau brand, and with that in mind we have launched Macon Igé, a single vineyard brand that won a gold medal at the IWC.”

Macon Igé sells for £17.99 at The Wine Reserve and other independents.

Tracey said: “It takes what everybody knows and thinks they know and adds more depth and concentration. It adds a more interesting experience. It’s almost a no brainer but nobody else is doing it.

“Macon Villages is the standard that everybody expects to see and Igé is where we would like to take the trade and consumers. It has greater depth of fruit and flavour and is a great food wine.

“We are asking the trade and consumers to take another look at Macon. There are interesting things there that we can do. Burgundy isn’t necessarily known for being innovative and this is something we can bring to the party that changes that.

“It’s a reason for buyers to look at Burgundy afresh. France is not necessarily known for its innovation compared to the New World, and this is an example of France developing in new and interesting directions. Taking a classic and taking it somewhere different. We expect some more interesting things to come out in the next six months.

“Burgundy is still a must-have, but we have to be relevant and accessible in terms of price and to be able to get hold of the stock. If you don’t get hold of the stock, you can’t play. This is another way of doing that, increasing our business and developing new wines from new places that bring a new conversation to the party.” 

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