Brazil aims to grow wine exports to the UK by 300%

22 May, 2013

Wines of Brazil aims to increase UK exports by 300% in the next three years.

The generic body represents 10 wineries that are interested in exporting to our shores.

PLB has snapped up Vini Brazil, Bibendum has taken Miolo and Stevens Garnier has added Aurora to its roster.

Wines of Brazil’s Ana Paula Kleinowski, who is overseeing the export project, believes the remaining seven wineries will gain distributors in the next two months.

Waitrose plans to run a Brazilian promotion in the spring of 2014, while Marks & Spencer sent its winemaker out to the south American nation to blend some wines that it will sell.

Copestick Murray is also launching an I Heart Brazil wine.

And with the upcoming Olympic Games and the World Cup set to see the world’s focus turned on Brazil, Kleinowski believes it will continue to strengthen its position in the global wine market.

The UK accounts for 10% of its exports and the body is determined to grow its presence in the UK off-trade.

Kleinowski said: “Our aim is to make the UK trade and consumers aware of the quality of wine we can produce.

“The eyes of the world will be on Brazil in the next few years and we think we can grow exports to the UK three times over by 2016.

When asked if Brazil could ever rival Chile and Argentina’s presence in the UK market, she said: “We have never exported bulk wine and we are offering a premium product.

“New Zealand would be a good comparison.”

Johnny Powell, director at Stevens Garnier, said: “It’s early days yet but the Brazilian wines we have are doing well. They are going into independents across the UK and we are talking to one or two supermarkets.

Fabiano Maciel, export manager at Miolo, said: “We are delighted to have our pink sparkling Pinot Noir and Chardonnay blend at Waitrose.

“It’s doing well and we are very pleased with what Waitrose have done.”

Bookmark this

Site Search


English wine: a happy harvest for Christmas

All across England and Wales, vineyards are being harvested. Down winding country lanes come armies of welly-wearing conscripts wielding secateurs and buckets, ready to reap the rewards of our vines. Happily they come, their cheeks ruddy with pride. Half an hour later they’re crawling over muddy clods with lacerated hands, drenched in claggy juice and cold sweat, as if ploughing through an endurance race.

Click for more »
Upcoming events


Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know