Prosecco boss to address sparkling wine symposium

13 October, 2011

The head of the consortium that protects Prosecco sparkling Italian wine from Conegliano Valdobbiadene is to address delegates at the International Sparkling Wine Symposium (ISWS), which takes place at Denbies wine estate in the UK on November 1-2.

The growth of Prosecco in the last 10 years has taken the international sparkling wine market has been significant and the wine now accounts for 15%* of all sparkling wines sold, with 115 million bottles exported all around the world. Total Prosecco production is 210 million bottles.

Giancarlo Vettorello, director of the Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore Consorzio, is set to give delegates an insight into what it perceives as the global success of Prosecco

The organisers say Vettorello will explain the current structure of Prosecco and its denominations - Prosecco DOC, Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore DOCG and Asolo Prosecco Superiore DOCG – before exploring the reasons behind the success and presenting some statistics for Conegliano Valdobbiadene Prosecco Superiore - the most famous area for Prosecco production, 50 km from Venice, where the history of Prosecco began 150 years ago.

The first day of the ISWS is devoted to production and Vettorello will present during the commercial sessions on day two. Delegate tickets, priced at £325 + VAT, and full programme information is available via the website

Jamie Goode, one of the organising team behind the International Sparkling Wine Symposium, said: “The success of ‘brand Prosecco’ in the last decade is outstanding. Specially commissioned research presented at the inaugural International Sparkling Wine Symposium in 2009 demonstrated the extent to which consumers consider Prosecco to be a badge of quality and reassurance. This year we’re looking forward to gaining a greater understanding of how this success has been achieved.”

* source: Vinexpo research.

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