18 April, 2008

Dominic Lockyer

The Fareham Wine

Cellar, F


What do you wish you had known when you started out as a retailer?

That the supermarket

Goliaths were going to change the wine industry. Also a foolproof method of enticing customers through the front door of our shop would be useful.

Does money motivate you?

I'm in the wrong business for that.

When did you first develop a passion for wine?

I was brought up with it by my parents, both on family holidays abroad

and at home.

It was a pretty European approach really.

Which celebrity do you most admire?

Neil Young. A cranky old buzzard, famously sued by his record company for not sounding like Neil Young and purposefully heading for the ditch after he found himself in the middle of the road.

What would you recommend to a customer wanting to splash out?

Top California

reds and red and white Burgundies. Really good colheita

ports always seem to be a surprise hit. Top Portuguese red wines as well, particularly Niepoort Batuta or Charme.

What job would you choose to do if you were reincarnated?


biology, which I actually studied at university. I think I would have liked to give it a go.

To see what might have been.

When you're not working, how do you seek your thrills?

I used to ski and play squash but I injured one of my knees. I enjoy playing the guitar and I am trying to learn the mandolin and plan on trying out bluegrass banjo next.

After a hard day's work, what drink do you kick back and relax with?

If it is hot, a nice, cold India Pale Ale or a Grand Cru Riesling from Alsace. In the colder months I am partial to Douro reds and fuller-bodied Burgundies.

In a nutshell my philosophy is:

Make a few waves, leave a few ripples and give Mother Nature a hand as much as you can.

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English wine: a happy harvest for Christmas

All across England and Wales, vineyards are being harvested. Down winding country lanes come armies of welly-wearing conscripts wielding secateurs and buckets, ready to reap the rewards of our vines. Happily they come, their cheeks ruddy with pride. Half an hour later they’re crawling over muddy clods with lacerated hands, drenched in claggy juice and cold sweat, as if ploughing through an endurance race.

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Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know