Sainsbury's splits own-labels

16 May, 2008

Range divided into six styles to help customers identify preferred varieties

Sainsbury's has divided its 170-strong own-label wine range into six style profiles in a move to help customers identify wines in their preferred style.

White wines will be put into categories for crisp and delicate, soft and fruity, and complex and elegant, while reds will be light and elegant, smooth and mellow, and rich and complex.

The colour-coded styles will appear on front labels, the top of the capsule and on neck-collars. The segmentation by style has been introduced on the back of consumer research that

revealed customers looked at the style of wine first before grape variety or country of origin, according to BWS category director Warren Anderson.

"We're hoping to broaden our customers' knowledge, help them become a little more experimental and give them the confidence to try something new .

"Customers told us they felt the Sainsbury's brand was very obvious [on the old labels] and people wanted it more recessive. They wanted us to talk to them about the wines in more modern language," he said.

The roll-out will begin in August and Anderson expects to see the entire redesign completed by next summer.

Sainsbury's has also introduced a rolling

top 10 display in 375 stores to highlight wines that share common characteristics. Starting with "new wines" and followed by "buyers' favourites", the theme will change every six weeks.

Award-winning wines, rosé and single varietals will also be in the spotlight, according to Anderson.

He

said the fixture had been developed after consumer research found that

most wine drinkers were still not confident about picking the right bottle.

Sainsbury's will

also launch a range of own-label, pre-filled, recyclable and shatterproof PET glasses

to boost its green credentials and make it easier for consumers to take wine to outdoor events .

The PET range will cover red, white and rosé wine and a French lager, and follows a trial of branded single-serve PET wine glasses in Sainsbury's convenience stores.




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