Seminar highlights

14 May, 2010

Industry briefingsWhere: The briefings have moved from the south gallery rooms to a purpose-built theatre on the show floor at stand S70

Bottling wine in a changing climate … maintaining momentum. The Waste & Resources Action Programme and industry insiders will explain how they have benefited from using better environmental practices for transporting and packing wine. Chaired by the WSTA, the session will look at how lightweighting and bulk importation can work for all sizes of wine businesses. May 18, 2pm-3.15pm. To book email retail.events@wrap.org.uk.

Oxygen and wine quality: A practical approach to a perplexing topic has been organised by non-profit organisation O2 in Wines. Its panel, including journalist Jamie Goode and oenologist Pierre-Yves Bournérias, will discuss how oxygen can affect the quality of wine and how the entire production process can be managed to ensure wine tastes like the winemaker intended. May 18, 4pm-5.30pm. Contact info@O2inWines.org.

Trends and opportunities in wine: product and packaging. Euromonitor International’s Marlous Kuiper, head of alcoholic drinks research, and Benjamin Punchard, head of packaging research, will investigate what impact the global downturn has had on the wine industry by looking at the different categories and regions. It will also explore key category and geographical growth opportunities in packaging. May 19, 10am-11am. Email florence.mazzone@euromonitor.com.

The Harpers debate – what the UK needs to do to make it a viable market for global wine producers will look at what steps key players are taking to ensure the UK is still a viable and competitive market in which to do business, despite costs of entry due to high duty rates, currency and pricing issues. May 19, 11am-12.30pm. Contact richard.siddle@william-reed.co.uk.

Rosé revolution: the secrets of success. The Consejo Regulador Navarra and Navarra Wine Exporters have teamed up in association with OLN to delve deeper into the boom in rosé sales. The seminar, chaired by OLN’s editor at large, Tim Atkin MW, will look at how the rosé category has burgeoned in the UK in the past five years and what the trends are going forward. May 19, 2pm-3.30pm. To book a place email angeline@winesofnavarra.co.uk or call 020 7193 0505.

Masterclasses?Where: east end of the hall

Why Rioja wine? Spanish sommelier Bruno Murciano and winemaker Jesús Amilburu will look at a selection of six representative wines from both classic and more innovative and modern wine producers from Rioja DO. The seminar will also include food from the area. May 18, 1.45pm-2.45pm. Contact servicio.calidad@larioja.org.

Wines of Chile is inviting attendees to Take a fresh look at Chile. Writer and broadcaster Peter Richards will highlight the progress Chile is making, with particular reference to Syrah as a grape variety showing great promise and the development of Chardonnay, notably from the cooler and coastal regions of Chile. May 18, 3.30pm-4.30pm. Email info@winesofchile.org.uk.

Oregon certified sustainable wine. More than a third of Oregon’s vineyard acreage is certified as sustainable, organic or biodynamic. Taste some of the wines and hear about the Oregon wine industry’s sustainability efforts from those who are practising it in their wineries. May 19, 1.45pm-2.45pm. Contact kate@hilltopwines.co.uk.

Why New Zealand aromatics? New Zealand Winegrowers will be taking a look at aromatic white wines with food and wine expert Simon Tam. He will be revealing the pure flavours of New Zealand’s leading aromatic grapes, such as Riesling, Pinot Gris and Gewürztraminer, while matching ingredients from the Pacific Rim, such as shredded ginger, sea salt and fresh chillies. May 19, 5pm-6pm. Contact alison@dillonmorrall.com.

Introduction to Croatian wines will present such indigenous grape varieties as Plavac Mali, Graševina and Malvazija Istriana. Saša Špiranec, author of the Guide to Croatian Wines, along with wine writer Anthony Rose will lead the tasting of the main Croatian varieties. May 20, 10.30am-11.30am. Contact ivona.grgan@gmail.com.

The Indian Grape Processing Board and the wineries on the new Indian pavilion will host a masterclass called Wines of India – traditionally modern. The India pavilion (stand D40) is the first participation on a collective platform in Europe by wineries from India and is made up of eight producers, including Sula, Indage and the new venture Four Seasons. May 20, 3pm-4pm.

Also worth checking out:

Where is the UK wine category heading? WSTA and Wine Intelligence use new research on consumer trends to make projections for the future. May 19, 9.45am-10.45am, Wine Intelligence Theatre, stand K70.

The essence of Spain. Tutored tastings hosted by Masters of Wine Peter McCombie and Lynne Sherriff will capture the diversity of Spain’s offering, from the windswept northern Atlantic coast, down through central Spain, over to the Mediterranean and ending in the sun-drenched south. Each session will look at a different region and finish with Spanish jamón. May 18-20 from 12pm-12.30pm on the Wines from Spain stand (Q45-S50).

The Sud de France umbrella brand unites Languedoc-Roussillon’s wine offer and will see Charles Metcalfe, Matthew Stubbs MW and Isabelle Légeron MW providing insights into the region with four tutored wine tastings. Each is held on the Sud de France stand (F30/12) and will last for 30 minutes, followed by a presentation for 2010. May 18, 2.30pm, May 19, 10am and 2pm and May 20, 2.30pm.

Wines of South Africa will be hosting a seminar entitled Water versus carbon footprint – the truth behind sustainability. It will feature the World Wide Fund for Nature’s Robin Farrington and Inge Kotze, and WOSA chief excutive Su Birch. May 19, 2pm-3pm, room 20, south gallery.

Wine faults workshops – sealed for the future will be two sessions focusing on the importance of oxygen during wine development and how cork, plastic and aluminium closures provide varying levels of ingression. May 19 in south gallery room 13, 11am-12.30pm, 3pm-4.30pm. Entry free with tickets in advance from fionaccampbell@btopenworld.com.




Bookmark this


Site Search

COMMENT

Donald Trump: the US has much to learn from history

The reasons Donald Trump should not be left in charge of a shopping trolley, let alone the keys to the White House, are plentiful and well-documented – from his use of the word “bigly” and lamentable business legacy to his dubious post-modern feminist principles, quite astonishing lack of political acumen and, most worrying of all, his bewildering hair. 

Click for more »
Upcoming events

Polls

Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know

Facebook

Twitter