Return to Oz

14 May, 2010

Following the success of the World Class Australia annual trade tastings at the Saatchi Gallery in February, the UK’s most popular wine country is clearly back on fine form. For this year’s LIWF there’s a wealth of events, new initiatives, launches and good old vintage updates from Down Under, along with many opportunities to catch up with the winemaking personalities behind Oz’s diverse portfolio.

Pick of the bunch are Wine Australia’s two masterclasses to be held on May 18 and 19 on Excel’s upper floor, to include a Landmark Coonawarra Cabernet tasting hosted by Andrew Caillard MW, plus a Barossa Old Vine Charter tasting hosted by Sam Holmes, of the Barossa Wine & Grape Association. Look out, too, for a host of leading personalities and wineries at Wine Australia’s stand where you can taste Australia’s “continental diversity” or indulge in a series of other bespoke tastings that Wine Australia is running throughout the fair. Stand N32??At Stratford’s Wine Agencies’ stand, director David Paxton is presenting a range of biodynamic wines from McLaren Vale – at 3pm each day – showing the biodynamic effects during the three days the fair falls over.

In addition, the new vintages of Pirie Tasmania wines will be shown, Winemaker Michael Hope will be showing his wines at the stand and the Deep Blue Wine Company launches a globally sourced range that counts Rosedale Shiraz from the Barossa Valley in its portfolio. Stand N22??High-altitude aficionados should seek out winemaker Debbie Lauritz of Cumulus Estate Wines, based in Orange, who will be showing a wide range of wines from across this cool-climate portfolio. Stand M10?Australia’s d’Aquino Company is launching Starfish, a new range of wines created by chief winemaker John Horndern to complement a wide variety of cuisines. Stand O15??At Australian Vintage’s stand McGuigan’s IWC White Winemaker of the Year, Neil McGuigan, will be highlighting both the newly launched Shortlist Range, plus an exciting new commercial level Semillon, a grape that McGuigan is championing as a key variety for Australia’s future. Stand N10 ?Semillon lovers will also want to head for the Fells stand where Tyrrell’s new vintage of the classic Vat 1 Hunter Valley Semillon will be on show, including comparative back vintages of the wine under both screwcap and cork. Stand P15 ?Zonte’s Footsteps, Evans & Tate and Geoff Merrill are the headline Australian wineries among PLB’s varied offerings this year. Stand N60??Brian Croser’s Tapanappa wines are the buzz Australia-wise at Mentzendorff’s stall this year. Stand O72 ?Buller Wines has winemaker-tutored tastings across the range of Calliope from Rutherford and Beverford near Swan hill, especially focusing on experimental varieties such as Tempranillo, Mourvèdre and Zinfandel, plus a tie-in with chocolate maker Melt of Notting Hill, which has produced chocolates specifically to pair with Buller’s fortified wines. Stand I3??Seckford Agencies will be joined by winemaker Shane Kerr of Trentham Estate, who will be presiding over his new Victoria range from Yarra, Mornington and Heathcote, plus Lucy Wilson, one half of the sister partnership at Bremerton in Langhorne Creek. Stand G3??Mitolo’s lower-alcohol Jester Range is back with the launch of its fourth wine, a Vermentino called Madame d’Or, at the Liberty stand. Stand P40??New brand Reservoir Range is aimed at keeping it simple for consumers, with labels such as Mr Red, Mr White and Ms Blonde having no regional, varietal or vintage information to confuse new wine drinkers. Stand R70??The results of the relaunch of Nugan Estate’s Black and White range as Vision can be sampled at the Myliko stand. Stand L10??Winemaker Steve Webber at De Bortoli will showcase new and old vintages, including highlights such as the first release of his very promising Riorret range single site Pinots from Yarra and Mornington, plus new NV sparkling wine Rococo Rose, blended from all three Champagne grapes. Stand N33??Ehrmanns is offering a quality taste of history with the wines of pioneer Tahbilk. Stand J35??Andrew Wigan, chief winemaker at Peter Lehmann Wines, is presenting his new duo of Layers wines – blends aimed at showing the sum can be greater than the parts – offering a new view into cross-site and cross-varietal blending. Stand N42??There’s much good to catch up with on

the Foster’s EMEA stand, including a focus on regional and boutique brands, including the LIWF debut for its Icons of South Australia collection, showcasing estates such as Annie’s Lane and Wynns Coonawarra Estate. Stand L42?Over at Pernod Ricard, Jacob’s Creek will unveil its new Regional Reserve Portfolio – essentially an overhauled and upgraded revamp of its Reserve quality tier – now with the range appellation-specific and covering many of the great Australian names.

The Classic, Three Vines and Heritage portfolios will also be shown by winemaker Phil Laffer. Stand K52/L50

?Enotria will have several winemakers on hand to showcase the new Little Yering Viognier/Shiraz addition to the Yering Station stable, and Glen Goodall with his Exmoor Drive, while Stephen Henschke of the eponymous estate will be involved in a series of First Families of Wine events. Stand N52??John Duval of John Duval Wines will be joining Liberty Wines at this year’s fair, showing his wines alongside other notable agencies including the likes of Shaw & Smith. Stand P40 ?Yellow Tail is showing its new colours, exhibiting with Percy Fox following the distribution agreement with brand owner Casella earlier this year. Stand L62??Crouchen is the latest new variety to feature in Brown Brothers eclectic range, showing alongside other highlights including the frizzante Cienna Rosso NV, plus sparkling and dessert wines from the premium Patricia label. Stand M12??At Bibendum, d’Arenberg’s distinctive classics such as Dead Arm Shiraz and Ironstone Pressings GSM are likely to steal the show. Stand L30 ?Finally, at Hatch Mansfield’s stand, Grant Burge will be showing its latest vintages, including flagship, sparkling and fortified wines. Stand P35

Bookmark this

Site Search


Hofmeister may need more than the bear essentials to succeed

So, George The Bear is back. It’s hard for some of us oldies to fathom, but there are those under, say, 40 who can’t actually remember Hofmeister and feel the cultural jolt supplied by the return of both the bear and the beer whose marketing campaigns it used to front.

Click for more »
Upcoming events


Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know