05 March, 2010

We find them very useful – really it’s the main opportunity we get to taste the wines. Everything we buy we buy on taste and we won’t stock wines unless we have tried and liked? them. Tastings are absolutely essential and they also allow us to catch up with our suppliers.”?Shane Dunning?Wood Winters??Bridge of Allan, Stirling??“I don’t find them all that useful – we get enough visits from reps, so it’s not essential to go. It’s good to go to tastings to try new vintages of wine that we sell – and if people are flying in from around the world it’s useful to meet them around the same time, but you rarely find anything that you’re not looking for.”?Dominic Lockyer?Fareham Wine Cellar?Fareham, Hampshire??“They are essential and very good for us. The fact that some big names have dropped out of the L?IWF is neither here nor there for independent retailers? as, dare I say it, it makes space for more interesting people. We can’t go to every fair as we’d never get any work done, but we try to go to as many as possible. LIWF is a very important date in the diary and SITT was fantastic. The country-specific stuff like Wines of Chile, Australia, Burgundy and New Zealand are all really good too.”?Stefan Botfield?City Beverage Company?Hoxton, London??“It’s unlikely I’ll go to the LIWF this year because it is just too brand-orient?ed. The market I’m in is much more eclectic and small. I’ll be attending the Burgundy tasting in France as I’m trying to get a range of wines that no one else has? – at affordable prices.”?Patrick Rosin?Smart Wines?Ascot, Berkshire??“I find them of limited use. We’d rather have samples sent to us here rather than go to tastings. If your money is good, people will send them.”?Will Bentley?Bentley’s Wine Merchants?Ludlow?Shropshire

Bookmark this

Site Search


English wine: a happy harvest for Christmas

All across England and Wales, vineyards are being harvested. Down winding country lanes come armies of welly-wearing conscripts wielding secateurs and buckets, ready to reap the rewards of our vines. Happily they come, their cheeks ruddy with pride. Half an hour later they’re crawling over muddy clods with lacerated hands, drenched in claggy juice and cold sweat, as if ploughing through an endurance race.

Click for more »
Upcoming events


Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know