Pernod Ricard ramps up ads

03 September, 2010

Pernod Ricard UK is increasing its pre-Christmas marketing spend by 30% over 2010.

The package will include a first-ever TV campaign for Chivas Regal Scotch whisky, a return to TV for Absolut and a major new TV sponsorship and ads for Jacob’s Creek.

There will also be TV support for the relaunched Brancott Estate New Zealand wine range, which will make its transition from the old name Montana at the end of September. Havana Club rum will be advertised in cinemas and outdoor, and there will be a poster campaign for Jameson Irish whiskey.

The pre-Christmas period will see the Jacob’s Creek Regional Reserve range of wines make its first foray into retail.

The range made its first public appearance at this year’s London International Wine Fair and a major multiple listing has been confirmed, although Pernod Ricard declined to divulge which retailer. The range comprises Adelaide Hills Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, Barossa Shiraz and Riesling, and Coonawarra Cabernet Sauvignon. The wines will have an rrp of £9.99.

There will be new Christmas gift packs for Chivas Regal, Glenlivet, Martell, Jacob’s Creek and Wyndham Estate, plus Mumm and Perrier-Jouët Champagnes.

Campo Viejo Rioja will be promoted at the BBC’s Masterchef Live exhibition in November.

Chris Ellis, Pernod Ricard’s channel director for off-trade spirits, said retailers should focus on premium brands at Christmas. “Across a 12-month period, £1 in £5 spent on spirits is on a premium brand, but this goes to £1 in £4 at Christmas.

“Premium spirits need to be given more space than others at this time of year. Some 43% of gift purchases are over £15 but the average take-home price of a bottle of spirits is £10.74. If you get your fair share of those gift sales then you’re going to be doing a lot better than average.”?He added that Pernod Ricard would be working to build sales of 35cl bottles.

Bookmark this

Site Search


English wine: a happy harvest for Christmas

All across England and Wales, vineyards are being harvested. Down winding country lanes come armies of welly-wearing conscripts wielding secateurs and buckets, ready to reap the rewards of our vines. Happily they come, their cheeks ruddy with pride. Half an hour later they’re crawling over muddy clods with lacerated hands, drenched in claggy juice and cold sweat, as if ploughing through an endurance race.

Click for more »
Upcoming events


Is blended Scotch overshadowed by single malt in retailers?

  • Yes
  • No
  • Don't know