Benefits of berry fruit boosted by booze

20 April, 2007

New scientific research has proved that serving strawberries in a daiquiri could make them healthier than simply eating the berries on their own.

The study by scientists in Thailand and America found that treating strawberries and other coloured berry fruits with alcohol increased the fruit's antioxidant capacity, therefore making them healthier.

Berries contain compounds known as polyphenols and anthocyanins which, when consumed, can help prevent diseases such as cancer.

A spokesman from the Journal of the Science of Food & Agriculture, where the findings were first published, said: "Those who aren't keen on strawberry daiquiris might be relieved to know that the scientists found similar results with blackberries, meaning that a blackberry-

crowned Champagne cocktail might achieve the same effect."

The news comes in the same week that the UK government decreed that wine counts as one of your five-a-day fruits. (No it didn't. Ed.)

Tacky totty on your tipple

Saucy ladies on beer bottles have been very much in the spotlight this week. The Portman Group sparked a sales rush at Beer Ritz in Leeds when it protested against the nudey lady on bottles of Rubbel Sexy Lager. "Everything about it just screams tacky and unpleasant, but it makes the perfect present for all your lonely male friends," commented consummate salesman Zak Avery. Meanwhile Slaters Ales in Staffordshire have had complaints about their Top Totty ale, which features a busty woman in a bikini with bunny ears and a tail on the label. One pub landlady has asked for new pump clips because she thinks the image is demeaning - a complaint the women who run the brewery don't understand at all. "I'd buy it," one of them told OLN. "It's something different, isn't it?"

Failing to measure up

The virulently pro-pub Campaign for Real Ale has announced that beer drinkers are losing £481 million every year because they are being served pints of beer that are only 95 per cent full - and it has launched a nationwide petition calling on the government to end short measures. Well, according to Camra the government promised they'd do this 10 years ago, and even if they agreed to it today it would take ages to get it through all that bureaucracy. So OLN has come up with an even better solution: buy your beer in a bottle from an off-licence. If the bottle looks like it's not full, don't part with your money. Easy!

Virtual banality

Watch out for young computer-types visiting your shop this week. They may be following up a challenge issued in the latest edition of internet newsletter B3TA: "How to get drunk for less than £5 - visit your local booze shop with a calculator and work out what's the most alcohol you can buy for a fiver. Make lots of graphs. Fall over."

In the winner's enclosure

While bookmakers estimate that over 16 million people enjoyed a flutter on the most famous horse race in the world, there was also massive media and public interest in the newest race on the Grand National card: the John Smith's People's Race. The nine-furlong charity race was won by Kevin Old, a 44-year old pawnbroker from Bournemouth, on Hoo La Baloo, ahead of Yorkshire dental practice manager Vanessa Marston and telephone engineer Alan Lane from Pickering .

The 10 novice riders who competed in the race collected £5,000 for their nominated charity, while the efforts of race winner Old earned an additional £50,000 for The Injured Jockeys' Fund and a personal prize trip to the Dubai World Cup.

But would-be jockey Jamie Robertson had an unscripted reality telly moment when his mount Super Sensation, the 5-4 favourite, dumped him after the winning post, and Robertson was taken to hospital for a suspected broken arm.

It's nearly time for the London Marathon, and 14 super-fit Fuller's workers are getting ready for the starting whistle. They're obviously all in great shape ... er, except for the fellow at the front, who takes "pear-shaped" to a whole new level.

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