News in brief

01 June, 2007

Percy Fox has appointed Anne Whittingdale assistant brand manager for the Vranken-Pommery Monopole portfolio. Whittingdale joined the company from González Byass last year. Colin Cameron, Percy Fox's marketing manager, said: "In recognition of the growing importance of the Champagne portfolio within our business, Anne has been appointed to this new role in order to strengthen and expand the Vranken-Pommery Monopole brand team."

Waverley TBS has launched Australian "cleanskin" wines in the UK. The wholesaler is looking to sell premium wine from top wineries in bottles with unbranded labels following the success of the concept in Australia. Owen Bird, senior winemaker for WaverleyTBS, said: "For the wine drinker it's all about discovery, anticipation and true value, with the wine remaining the hero and not the fancy label." Bottles will have an rrp of £4.99.

Bibendum has appointed Roger Gabb as non-executive director. Gabb was founder and former chairman of Western Wines . Gabb described Bibendum as "a truly go-ahead, prestigious and specialist wine company that is growing fast".

Beaujolais Wines has launched a three-year promotional campaign. The push will focus on Beaujolais, Beaujolais Villages and the Fleurie, Brouilly and Morgon Crus, emphasising their "accessibility and fresh character". The remaining seven Beaujolais Crus will feature "where appropriate" to help raise the awareness. The campaign will comprise above and below-the-line activities, targeted at the UK market.

An external human resources service has been set up exclusively for the wine trade. Working Wine is an advisory, recruitment and training service which has been set up by WSET lecturer and HR professional Ruth Hancock. The service is aimed at small to medium-sized businesses without HR departments that need help with staffing issues including training and recruitment. For more information, .

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English wine: a happy harvest for Christmas

All across England and Wales, vineyards are being harvested. Down winding country lanes come armies of welly-wearing conscripts wielding secateurs and buckets, ready to reap the rewards of our vines. Happily they come, their cheeks ruddy with pride. Half an hour later they’re crawling over muddy clods with lacerated hands, drenched in claggy juice and cold sweat, as if ploughing through an endurance race.

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