Brewer throws weight behind crackdown on proxy buying

09 August, 2007

Project Blitz meets with success in tackling alcohol-related problems

Dorset brewer Hall & Woodhouse is backing

Project Blitz - aimed at combating proxy purchasing in the county.

The multi-agency scheme has so far tackled alcohol-related antisocial behaviour and the next phase of the campaign, Blitz Wize, will highlight the growing problem of adults buying alcohol for consumption by children.

Posters have been sent out to off-licences and are being displayed on bus shelters reminding the public it is illegal to buy alcohol on behalf of under-18s.

Hall & Woodhouse vice chairman Mark Woodhouse said: " The vast majority of alcohol is consumed legally and responsibly, but we are very keen to play our part in the reduction of alcohol-related anti-social behaviour. Project Blitz is a great initiative that has made a visible difference in Dorset."

Sergeant Nikki Billington, of Dorset police, said: "With the introduction of proof of age cards and frequent test-purchasing operations, buying alcohol under-age is no longer so easy. Consequently, young people are now more inclined to ask older friends or relatives to buy it for them."

Drinks retailers in Mid Devon are also hoping to reduce proxy purchasing by including a warning message on receipts.



created customer information leaflets on

proxy purchasing and sensible alcohol consumption advice.

Scot land's Sinclair Breweries is printing alcohol unit information on its bottled beer . The website address of the Drinkaware Trust is also to be included on the label. Managing director Norman Sinclair said: "I think it's important that the drinks industry takes a more responsible attitude towards the issue of alcohol consumption and we were keen to

back this new voluntary agreement."

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