Greater coverage for Asda's Challenge 25 campaign

23 August, 2007

Successful trial to be extended to more stores in England and Scotland

Asda is rolling out a Challenge 25 policy to more shops in England and Scotland following a successful trial in 10 Scottish stores.

In a move to crackdown on under-age alcohol sales, the retailer will extend the trial in Scotland and introduce it to some of its shops in the Swindon area.

Customers will be asked to produce photo ID in the form of a photo card, driving license, passport or PASS accredited proof of age card if they look under 25-years-old and are buying alcohol.

Asda already operates the nationally-recognised Challenge 21 policy, but decided to trial the new scheme in 10 Scottish stores in May after 23 per cent of people it surveyed thought a group of 16-year-olds were aged over 21.

David Stewart, category director for BWS, said the scheme was vital to help eliminate sales of alcohol to under-18s. "For us it's very important to encourage our customers to drink responsibly," he said.

As part of its move towards promoting sensible drinking, Asda is introducing a bay of non-alcoholic and low-strength lagers in 120 of its stores.

Beer buying manager CJ Antal-Smith called the decision a "massive move from a sales perspective". Earlier this year Asda became the first supermarket to remove all 50cl super strength canned beers and lagers from its shelves.

In addition, the retailer has redesigned its own-label wine labels to include a s­ensible drinking message for women who are pregnant or trying to conceive. It has also added more detailed information about the number of units in a large and small glass of wine.

Asda's wine buying manager Philippa Carr MW said: "Giving the information will help our consumers drink moderately. We do take our responsibility very seriously."

Meet Asda's beer, wine and spirits team - page 18.

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