There's no such thing as a free lunch - but there is Free Beer

23 August, 2007

St Austell joins art project to make brewing recipe available worldwide

A Cornish brewery has brewed a free beer as part of an international art project.

St Austell Brewery is the first UK brewer to take part in the Free Beer venture, which started out in Denmark and travel­led to Japan and Brazil before coming to the UK.

Free Beer does not mean the beer is free to buy - but its recipe is freely avail­able on the internet.

Danish art group Superflex set up the project, which is based around the idea of open-source software. This can be downloaded for free and is developed and improved by its users.

Superflex published a recipe for beer which was brewed in Denmark, then Japan and Brazil. St Austell took the recipe and brewed it with water from its private spring, locally-grown Maris Otter barley and guarana - an addition made by the Brazilian brewery.

Head of marketing Jeremy Mitchell said: "Every time it is brewed it has got a slightly different take. It is very different from St Austell brewery beers because our beers tend to be quite dry hop with quite a dry taste, whereas this has a slightly sweeter taste. The guarana does give you a little lift - it's a bit like caffeine."

St Austell got involved in the project through an art group from the Tate St Ives. Mitchell said: "It seemed like a good thing to do, partly to support the Tate but also for awareness of St Austell brewery."

The beer is sold at the Tate galleries in London and Liverpool as well as St Ives. It will also be for sale at the brewery's ­visitor centre and website and at selected on-trade outlets.

Head brewer Roger Ryman added: "St Austell Brewery is very excited about the Free Beer concept.

"This allows us to share ideas with other brewers around the world, while imparting our unique local accent on to the brewing of the beer."

To find out more about the project visit

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